Who's who?

Personnel


Prof J. Doyne Farmer
Director of Complexity Economics Professor of Mathematics
email:
doyne.farmer@inet.ox.ac.uk
website:
http://www.doynefarmer.com
J. Doyne Farmer is Director of the Complexity Economics program at the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, Professor in the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford, and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. His current research is in economics, including agent-based modeling, financial instability and technological progress. He was a founder of Prediction Company, a quantitative automated trading firm that was sold to the United Bank of Switzerland in 2006. His past research includes complex systems, dynamical systems theory, time series analysis and theoretical biology. During the eighties he was an Oppenheimer Fellow and the founder of the Complex Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. While a graduate student in the 70’s he build the first wearable digital computer, which was successfully used to predict the game of roulette.


David Pugh
Postdoctoral Research Officer
email:
drobert.pugh@gmail.com
website:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidrpugh
David Pugh is developing open-source, scalable, data-driven, and reproducible agent-based models (ABMs) of using Akka, Cassandra, Scala, and Spark. He is broadly interested in computational economics, particularly projection methods for solving functional equations, and "Big Data" econometrics using Julia, Python, and R. He is keen on learning new methodologies for enhancing reproducibility of computational scientific research.


Davoud Taghawi-Nejad
Postdoctoral Research Officer
email:
taghawinejad@maths.ox.ac.uk
website:
http://www.taghawi-nejad.de
Davoud Taghawi-Nejad holds a PhD in Economics of Complexity and Innovation. He published on business cycles, network effects of central bank policy, the use of artificial intelligence and computational methods in economics. At MIT and the University of Sao Paulo Davoud applied this research to create policy simulators. Amongst others he created simulations of the Saudi Arabian Labor market and the Brazilian education system in order to improve policy making in this fields. This research was conducted using a modelling platform he developed called Agent-Based Computational Economy Platform (ABCE).


Torsten Heinrich
Postdoctoral Research Officer
email:
torsten.heinrich@maths.ox.ac.uk
website:
https://authors.repec.org/pro/phe570/
Torsten Heinrich studied economics at the Dresden University of Technology, Germany, and the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, and received his PhD from the University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, in 2011 with a thesis on technological change and growth patterns with network effects. Having held a post-doc position at the University of Bremen until 2016, he joined the INET Oxford in October 2016, where he works on agent-based modeling. His research interests also include economic complexity, industrial organization, evolutionary economics, and economic aspects of the information technology sector.


Alissa Kleinnijenhuis
DPhil Candidate
email:
alissa.kleinnijenhuis@maths.ox.ac.uk
website:
http://www.inet.ox.ac.uk/people/view/101
Alissa Kleinnijenhuis is currently doing her Dphil under the supervision of Professor Doyne Farmer. She is affiliated with the Mathematical and Computational Finance Group, which is a research group in the Mathematics Department. Her research focuses on systemic risk. She is mainly interested in developing realistic mathematical models of financial contagion. Her current work focuses on: financial contagion via multiple channels (such as via overlapping portfolio’s and via several different kinds of exposures), and stress testing.


Adrián Carro
Postdoctoral Research Officer
email:
adrian.carro@maths.ox.ac.uk
website:
http://www.inet.ox.ac.uk/people/view/133
Adrián obtained a degree in Physics from the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela and a master's degree on Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI). He developed his master's thesis at the École Normale Supérieure (Paris), where he used concepts from statistical mechanics and autocatalytic processes to design a spatial economics model with which to study the role of transportation costs and spatial inhomogeneities in a context of sustainable development. He completed his PhD at the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems (IFISC, Palma de Mallorca). During that time he worked on agent-based models of collective dynamics in socio-economic systems, investigating the mechanisms behind processes such as the formation of opinions in social groups, the competition of languages in bilingual communities, and herding behaviour in financial markets. He is interested in the development of agent-based modelling techniques and the use of analytical tools from statistical physics for the purpose of understanding the economy as a complex system, with a focus on policy assessment. He is currently involved both in the MISTRAL project (Multi-scale infrastructure systems analytics), where he uses spatially-distributed agent-based models to study the economic impact of infrastructure investments, and in the housing market project, where he contributes to the development of a spatial agent-based model of the UK housing market.


Benjamin C. Herd
External Consultant
email:
b.herd@oxon.org
website:
http://www.multiagent-simulation.net/
A Computer Scientist by education, Benjamin C. Herd is primarily a Multiagent Systems & Simulation Researcher. His work is concerned with the analysis of complex adaptive systems by means of agent-based techniques, with a particular focus on the development of efficient modelling, simulation, verification, and analysis approaches. He believes in interdisciplinary research and likes to combine ideas from areas as diverse as Computer Science, Mathematics, Philosophy, Economics, and Sociology. Benjamin C. Herd has more than 13 years of R&D experience, and is currently working as a Researcher at Bosch. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from King's College London, an MSc in Software Engineering from the University of Oxford, and an MSc in Computer Science from the University of Hagen.


Juan Sabuco
Postdoctoral Research Officer
email:
juan.sabuco@maths.ox.ac.uk
website:
http://www.juansabuco.com/
Juan obtained a Bsc+MSc degree in Telecommunications Engineering from Universidad Miguel Hernández and a Master in Physics and Modelling of Complex Systems from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. During his master thesis he explored the covariant formulation of the Maxwell Equations in order to provide a novel procedure to design invisible devices. He completed his PhD at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos under the supervision of Prof. Miguel A.F. Sanjuán. In his PhD he worked in Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Theory developing a new control method of chaotic systems, called Partial Control. During his PhD he also did a research stay at the University of Maryland where he collaborated with Prof. James A. Yorke. He has also held an Assistant Professor position at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos where he has worked on several topics like modelling and control of microeconomic systems, predictability of complex systems and quantum chaos. He has recently joined INET at Oxford to work on agent-based modeling. He is interested in the development of data acquisition techniques for agent-based models, the calibration of multiparameter models and the use of tools from Nonlinear Dynamics for the purpose of predicting the future behaviour of complex economic systems. He is currently involved in the ESL project, where he uses advanced agent-models in order to study the complexity and multi-dimensional interactions found in the modern insurance markets.


Thom Wetzer
DPhil Candidate
email:
thom.wetzer@univ.ox.ac.uk
website:
https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/people/thom-wetzer
Thom Wetzer is a DPhil candidate in Law and Finance at the University of Oxford, the Oxford-Man Institute of Quantitative Finance, and the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School. His research, supervised by Prof. Luca Enriques, Prof. Alan D. Morrison, and Prof. J. Doyne Farmer, focuses on systemic risk, from two angles. First, he studies the regulation of systemically important financial institutions (“SIFIs”) and the effects of such regulation on the (re)organisation of the banking sector. Second, Thom conducts research in the areas of system-wide financial stress tests and economic simulations. Thom holds a BA(Hons) in Law and Economics from University College Utrecht (partially completed at UC Berkeley and the Berkeley School of Law), an LLB in Dutch Law from Utrecht University, and an MSc in Law and Finance from the University of Oxford. His professional experience includes work at the European Commission (DG FISMA) (Brussels), Goldman Sachs (London) and De Brauw Blackstone Westbroek (Amsterdam and New York).


Rudy H. Tanin
email:
noether@protonmail.com
website:
https://rht.github.io/
Rudy H. Tanin is a theoretical physicist, with a Bachelor of Science from the MIT. He is a core developer of the ABCE project and a former developer of the IPFS project. Currently he is a contributor to Zulip, an open source Slack competitor. His interests are varied, from pragmatic technical endeavours in FLOSS projects to philosophy in general.



Former personnel


Paul Rauwolf
Postdoctoral Research Officer
Paul Rauwolf was one of the lead software architects at the beginning of the ESL project. After attaining his PhD at the University of Bath using agent-based models to explain biases in human decision-making, he joined INET as part of the Amlin insurance project, focusing on how the use of second-best risk models affect the trade-off between profitability and the safety of diversification.


Rafa Baptista
DPhil Candidate
While undertaking an MSc and a DPhil at the Computer Science department and at INET, supervised by Prof. Doyne Farmer and Dr. Ani Calinescu, Rafa had important contributions to both the housing market and the stress testing projects. In particular, his research focused on the calibration and performance of agent-based models. Before Oxford, Rafa studied Aeronautical Engineering at Cambridge and had some work experience in electric vehicles and in tidal energy at the Whittle Laboratory. He was a member of both Sommerville and Keble College, and his research was funded by an EPSRC studentship.

Affiliations